• Flattr FoI: 
Falkvinge &Co. on Infopolicy
BEFORE-FALKVINGE-IF-ANY FALKVINGE &CO. ON
INFOPOLICY
Falkvinge on Infopolicy - Home
»
Frame from the short film Plurality

“Plurality”: An Amazing Short Film About Surveillance In 2023

48

Privacy

Privacy

I usually don’t watch video. The format bores me. But I found this short film about the current developments amazing.

Normally, when I start watching a feature film, I skip past the intro. Then, I watch for a minute or two before I get impatient and start skipping all over the movie, trying to get a feel for what it’s about. After some 30 seconds or so of this activity, I give up and go to Wikipedia to read the plot line instead. Sometimes, I go back to the movie afterwards.

In other words, I have absolutely no patience for the video format, where I can’t evaluate if something is interesting and relevant before having seen all of it in real time. I feel it’s disrespectful of my time and attention to take away my possibility of gradually evaluating if something deserves more attention, as I can do with anything in text format.

This short film, however, had me absorbed from the get-go. When it was over, it felt like 30 seconds had passed. That in itself is remarkable – but the short film also communicates a very chilling insight into where we’re going. The movie is about ever-increasing surveillance, and how it always ends up where we don’t want it – with quite a few surprises baked in.

In the movie, DNA scanners are everywhere, and links your DNA with centralized access control lists to everything. Predictably, it started out as a convenience, until legislation stipulated that law enforcement can and shall have access to all of it. The plot twists towards the end are gripping.

Watch it here. Or don’t. Watch it in fullscreen HD on YouTube. There’s also a Facebook page for discussing directly with the film’s crew, including the director Dennis Liu.

And on a meta-level, this really shows how you can be successful without a traditional movie studio. It was filmed on consumer-level equipment; Canon 5D and 7D.

(Via Hax, via Lake, both in Swedish.)

You've read the whole article. Why not subscribe to the RSS flow using your favorite reader, or even have articles delivered by mail?

About The Author: Rick Falkvinge

Rick is the founder of the first Pirate Party and is a political evangelist, traveling around Europe and the world to talk and write about ideas of a sensible information policy. He has a tech entrepreneur background and loves whisky.

Liked This?

By participating in the discussion and posting here, you are placing your contribution in the public domain (CC0). If you are quoting somebody else, credit them.

Contributors take own responsibility for their comments.

48

  1. 1
    j

    I feel you on the cons of video:)

  2. 2

    Oh, wow. I feel just like you about video in general… and about this film in particular. There really is very little to comment without going into a detailed critique which is off-topic here. Yeah… that’s a future to be very afraid of. Gattaca? Pffft! What an optimistic story.

  3. 3
    steelneck

    Then why are you doing your part in helping this development to become true?

    You may be surprised by this question, coming from me, but ask your self why you think that facebook, google and what not needs to know that i visit your blog? Maybe you think it is “convenience”.

    You know the saying about the difference between being raped and making love when we talk about sharing private information. You force your visitors to use protective measures to escape “unvoluntary sex” when they visit your blog. I know that you know what you are doing, but maybe it is that convenience thing or worse that you think it justifies your means.

    You have a lot of code on your blog that calls home so to speak, scripts, widgets and images that sneak on your visitors and tell “chose your poison” who is visiting and when. I have blocked 48 scripts and a lot objects on your page, things that spy on me. This is a lot, especially coming from you. For me who know how it is an inconvenience having to protect my self, but do you really think it is fair to other people that do not know how to protect them self?

    I know that you know how it works, you know how much info that can be mined through server logs and cookies, especially if you have access to a global network of spying code. With the examples of facebook, google and yahoo it gets so extensive that government agencies can look pale.

    Most people do not have a clue and when it is pointed out to them they usually just try to brush away the uncomfortable just pointed out for them so they can go on with their life, a bit Niemuller over it. They do not even want to think about it, but i know that you do..

    This is how it starts, through convenience, simpleminded and carefree people. When pointed out to authors of blogs and webmasters they talk about convenience, ease of use and get things done, a bit of the argument around having a clean sheets and nothing to hide can also bubble up. But worse it can also be about justifying the means, that their purposes some how stands above other peoples and they actually give a shit about consequences for others they obviously do not respect when it is put against their purposes. They think they are above other people.

    You really need to clean up you act on your own blog. What has to go is code that “phone home”, so your visitors can chose by them self if they want “chose your poison” to know that they visited falkvinge.net

    • 3.1
      Libreman

      Very good point, when even the most vocal proponents of privacy do not care enough in their actual actions as to no report their readers to the biggest dataminers in the world about what they’re reading, how serious are they in what they talk about?

      I’d like to know an answer to this by Rick, how did this happen? Has he not thought about it, is he considering the advantages it provides him more valuable than his readers privacy? What is his thinking on this?

      Cheking out my blocker I see five trackers:
      Clicky
      Facebook
      Flattr
      Google
      Twitter

      3 of them are among THE biggest dataminers in the world, it cant’ get much worse than that. What is your thinking on this Rick?

    • 3.2

      You’re right, of course.

      But it keeps being a tradeoff. Once I added a global Content Distribution Network for my blog, to be able to deliver on traffic spikes (which I must be able to do), I was already telling somebody else who visited.

      Thus, my principles had been broken over the priority to be able to deliver my ideas when interest about them is at its peak. Once you tell one external party (here, CloudFlare) about who visits you, you realize that your principles are broken – and you carefully weigh further intrusions against whether it helps you get the word out better, or if it’s just a convenience. Here’s the third parties that are informed of every visitor to my site:

      CloudFlare – the distribution network and reverse cache that keeps my site alive during traffic spikes (such as when I’m topping Reddit).

      Clicky – This service displays real-time traffic data and referrers. Its primary value to me is that I see immediately when one of the big aggregators (Hacker News, Slashdot, Reddit, etc) publish one of my articles, and that enables me to jump into the discussion thread and engage with people who read my ideas. In short, it enables a dialog for me which is invaluable.

      Google Analytics and +1 – Analytics is the standard tool for measuring traffic apples-to-apples, and the +1 button gives no extra data to Google since I’m already using Analytics.

      Bloggportalen (a Swedish blog ranking site) – sort of an experiment to see if people notice this being one of the largest Swedish blogs on politics. I may remove this again soon if there’s no payout.

      SharedCount – see those little +nnn by every article? They are fetched client-side directly from the SharedCount service; there is no good way to do this server-side at the moment that I’ve found. On occasion, this has overloaded ShareCount when traffic here is heavy… :)

      Facebook – I really hate Facebook’s guts, but as a politician, I don’t have the luxury of choosing where people are. If I stand on a soapbox in any speakers’ corner across the world, I’d be extremely lucky if 1,000 people passed by and heard part of my message. There are one billion people on Facebook. You can hate it as much as you like (and I certainly do) – but if I want to reach people, I have to do it where they are, and not where I want them to be.

      Twitter – pretty much as Facebook.

      Flattr – yeah, but these are overall good guys. For now, anyway.

      I don’t add external trackers lightly, and as you say, I’m very aware of when I’m sending trackable traffic to a third party: I understand the technology to that level of depth. I never do it just for fun, but each and every one needs to be an enabler to reach more people with the basic ideas.

      Even if those ideas are, well, “what I’m doing right now is actually wrong”.

      Cheers,
      Rick

      EDIT: Also, Gravatar, as rightly pointed out. I’d like to run this server-side but don’t know of any plugin that does – even one called Avatar Privacy considered it a non-problem that clients tell Automattic of their client behavior, and that’s the exact problem I’d like to solve.

      • 3.2.1
        steelneck

        Helping the biggest dataminers spy upon decent people is _not_ a prerequisite to be heard and listened to. Now you talk just like those politicians you are fighting against where the goal justifies the means. They usually have national security, protection of citizens and such as their “excuses”, your excuse is that you want to be read(!). How can you expect to be taken seriously with such an obvious double standard? You even say your self that you have broken principles. Who do you think you are?

        You are simply putting your own urge to be heard, and convenience to do it technically, above your readers right to not be spied upon, that is really to disrespect people.

      • 3.2.2
        Anon

        I know a few sites which advertise their “social media” links without poisoned code. You can link an article to facebook without letting facebook know who visited your own site on your own servers.

        • Any tips on how I can do better are always welcome – that goes without saying.

          Cheers,
          Rick

        • Libreman

          You’re one google search away from finding out how to do it. Again, this goes to show that you haven’t really tried which is very disappointing.

          But well, what is done is done – the question is that now that you know it can be fixed, will you? If you need help, post an article asking for it – it could be valuable not only for you but for others who want to minimize spying on their readers. Please address this and be an example to others…

        • @Libreman:

          Well, I _did_ try to find better methods when I constructed this page almost two years ago, and didn’t find any that were good enough back then. Saying I’m just one google away isn’t the entire truth, is it? Google doesn’t alert me that something has now appeared, something that I searched for two years ago.

          That said, I’ll be devoting some serious time to fixing this as soon as my current crazy presentation tour ends, and thanks for the heads-up. Not sure how far I can get, but every step forward is one in the right direction.

          In particular, I’d like to get rid of toxic code connecting with Facebook. As a secondary priority, Twitter and Google. Not sure I can get rid of _every_ opportunity to track visitors (like disconnecting the CDN), but I’d like to find out how far I can go.

          Ironically, this is the walled garden vs. net centric debate, and for once, net liberty activists are on the walled garden side.

          Cheers,
          Rick

        • Libreman

          Thank you, your willingness to address it is very encouraging. And as I said, if you run into problems or don’t know how to do certain things just ask the community at large. Many will be more than happy to help you, includig me of course.

          Also, I’m no too worried about CDN as opposed to Google or Facebook which have built their entire bussiness models on harvesting and analysing data about people. It’s very unlikely that a CDN would be analysing their access logs for commercial purposes and offer datasets to third parties – which is pretty much a given for G & F.

          I remember that that was a big issue a while ago about some big German(?) site linking to FB in a privacy respecting manner and FB complaining about it and threatning to block them. Which goes to show that the spying is not a side-effect or neccessary for the widgets to function – it’s a conscious choice on the part of FB and they’re willing to fight for their ability to spy on you.

          So well, good luck with making the site as privacy-aware as possible, I hope to hear from you soon reporting on your results ;)

      • 3.2.3
        John Smith

        You can get rid of facebook, twitter, flattr, and Google Plus by simply hosting images of the +1/like/tweet/whatever on your own website, putting them where the like/+1/whatever buttons would be, and manually linking them to wherever they would link. The only thing you lose is the count of facebook likes and the number of +1’s being displayed on the page directly. Is that really worth it?

        Also, it is worth it to get rid of Google Plus while keeping Google Analytics. That’s because Google Analytics is served from google-analytics.com, which doesn’t have your google account cookie. The +1 button on the other hand is served from a subdomain of google.com, thus it has your Google account cookie (which it needs, in order to let you +1 the page). Of course, Google can do some matching on their end, but at least you don’t have to make it any easier on them.

        • Libreman

          You can also get rid of Google Analytics by using Piwik instead, either hosted or host yourself – both are several orders of magnitude better than Google.

          Many of the advantages you list are easily achievable without reporting your readers to third parties. That you have not implemented it in that way shows that you haven’t really tried and subsequently that privacy of your readers is not too high on your priority list. For a privacy advocate that is deeply troubling.

          It’s not hard to post an article asking for help to minimize spying you enable, many people would be eager to help … so why no such article so far? Maybe it is time to do it?

          The way you dismiss privacy concers so easily is also not very comforting either.

        • @Libreman: Thanks for the tip about Piwik, that looks like an excellent replacement! I’m a bit worried about scalability, though – load for analytics (writes) will be at its most intense when I’m hitting Reddit front or similar things, and at that point, I need all the capacity I can get to serve pages from the web servers.

          Do you have any experience with this? Database writes are _exceedingly_ expensive when you’re under heavy, heavy load.

        • Libreman

          I’m using Piwik for my site but obviously I do not have such big peaks that you might get so I personally do not have experience wth that.

          But Piwik developers are very focused on scalability and performance and reported Piwik being used on very traffic heavy websites so it is capable of handling it. The question is what kind of processing power is required to deliver that kind of performance … for that, the best course of action is to ask Piwik devs directly, I’m sure they’ll be more than happy to assist you …

      • 3.2.4
        Apple

        You forgot gravatar.

      • 3.2.5
        John

        You can get rid of facebook, twitter, flattr, and Google Plus by simply hosting images of the +1/like/tweet/whatever on your own website, putting them where the like/+1/whatever buttons would be, and manually linking them to wherever they would link. The only thing you lose is the count of facebook likes and the number of +1’s being displayed on the page directly. Is that really worth it?

        Also, it is worth it to get rid of Google Plus while keeping Google Analytics. That’s because Google Analytics is served from google-analytics.com, which doesn’t have your google account cookie. The +1 button on the other hand is served from a subdomain of google.com, thus it has your Google account cookie (which it needs, in order to let you +1 the page). Of course, Google can do some matching on their end, but at least you don’t have to make it any easier on them.

        Also, you’re using ajax.googleapis.com to load JavaScript libraries which you could host yourself as well. Is the supposedly faster load time worth it?

        Also, internetdefenseleague.org. They’re probably “good guys” as well, but they don’t really need to know about the visitors to this site.

      • 3.2.6
        Ano Nymous

        Actually, I agree completely with steelneck in comment 3.2.1.

        It is called hypocricy.

        There is however one thing you could do: Let people come to a site where they choose one of two alternatives: One is a surveillance-free page, well, except for you and the ISP and in some cases the FRA. Preferrably an https site so the latter two can only see that one visits the site but not what page or who they are in the comment fields.

        The other is a full-function page with all Facebook, Google and everything plugins, and a WARNING SIGN above the link, that informs the visitor that BIG BROTHER in the form of Facebook, Google etc. IS WATCHING YOU!

    • 3.3
      Ano Nymous

      I don’t know where you’re from (and I don’t need to either), but here in Sweden it is illegal to register someones political opinion. It’s called ‘åsiktsregistrering’ (litterally ‘opinion registration’). If one comments here, writing ones political opinion, but anonymously (or at least presumedly anonymously), or just frequently visiting this site should give a good hint, but someone, for example Facebook, registers it, that would propably be åsiktsregistrering. Facebook isn’t based in Sweden, so that’s propably not illegal there, but wouldn’t Rick Falkvinge actually be assisting that registration? I’m no law expert, but i know that for many crimes, i don’t know if it’s all or just many, assisting in committing them is also illegal. Also, I don’t know if assisting something that is a crime in Sweden, from Sweden, but being done somewhere where it is’nt a crime is legal or illegal. Tricky, this law stuff…

      • 3.3.1

        Well, visiting this site doesn’t tell me what political opinions you hold, in a strict sense.

        However, sharing the visits with Facebook is plain wrong and I’ve received several tips on how to avoid that – everything from “delete the damn thing” to more technically intriguing methods.

        I’ll implement one of them – don’t know which yet, maybe a combination – as soon as this speaking tour is over early November and I get some hacking time.

        Cheers,
        Rick

        • Ano Nymous

          My answer was to steelneck, but thanks! (That sounded wrong, but I don’t know how to express it better in English. It was just meant as a fact, if you thought it was for you (I know you’re Swedish and would not intentionally register peoples’ opinions yourself) and i like that you answered) I wasn’t talking about you registring your visitors’ opinions. I was talking about you assisting Facebook, Google and a handful others in registering opinions by using their plugins on a politically charged page where one can also make fairly anonymous comments. Of course, unless one takes precautions, the authorities can see who comments if they use the FRA or raid your servers, and use the IP address data from the ISPs that the data retention directive is about, but that doesen’t mean that there’s no extra damage sending the data to the companies I mentioned.

          About the remedy: What du you think about my idea in comment 3.2.6? “Facebook or Privacy, make your choice”. It could perhaps have a nice side-effect of informing, reminding and making people aware that there are a number of companies tracking them across the interwebz..

        • Ano Nymous

          Also, I have a comment on the article “the imminent dollar collapse explained to an 8-year-old”.

          I don’t want to bother you with unimportant things, but please answer if you have a minute or two sometime. I come back a little now and then to comment fields in which I have asked questions or otherwise may get a response, so I will surely read it.

    • 3.4
      Cole

      You say you’re blocking scripts and objects. So you are one of the people who really cares and wants to do something about privacy. But there are just as many people (probably more) who don’t care, and like that convenience. You are in control of how your browser loads pages, and what scripts it executes, and what external objects it retrieves, so I don’t mean to be rude but I do have to wonder why it matters?

      Your privacy should be primarily your concern. Not somebody else’s concern. I do think that if Rick wants to “clean up” his site (and by the look of other comments, he probably does) then it is something that would be nice and I would appreciate it too, but I’m just trying to say that it’s not his obligation to do so.

      If you go walking on a road and you don’t want to leave any trace, you need to get rid of your footprints. It is not the fault of the road owner if you track some mud and make footprints across the asphalt.

  4. 4
    relghuar

    Well, not very original – like a cross between Looper, Minority Report and Enemy of the state, nothing new. Personally I had to fast-forward the “thrilling” run scene :-/
    And to the plot – please, really?? Time travel is possible, but they can’t send anyone to the point BEFORE they can be so easily captured and detained, or at LEAST equip them with something useful??? Now THAT is a B class hollywood movie in its perfection.

    • 4.1
      mijj

      .. and 12 Monkeys

    • 4.2
      Socrates

      <>

      “And to the plot – please, really?? Time travel is possible, but they can’t send anyone to the point BEFORE they can be so easily captured and detained”

      And do what?
      As in what can you do now.

      “or at LEAST equip them with something useful?”

      Useful as in items you have access to now? If you use it before this surveillance happens, will it be prevented? How exactly? And that is not a rhetoric question.

      If you use it after the surveillance is in place, how can you prevent the predictable response that you in fact is the reason why it is necessary to go to such length with the surveillance. After all, you attack the system that is meant to keep the inhabitants safe.

      IMHO, most good science fiction foster thoughts about who we choose to be, and why we act a certain way; from a reference point that we might not have considered. It relates directly to that persons life. A “futuristic super gadget” would make the film less relevant. The film would cause fewer thoughts about what we can do. It would give a “solution” to the dilemma that does not exist in the real world.

      <>

      It is already happening.

      The Swedish FRA law, government employees that demand to snoop in travelers personal devices, Norwegian state broadcast journalists that notice that critical articles is inaccessible in USA, censorship of Gardian [1,2] in UK, TSA in USA establish checkpoints on interstate roads, …

      The freedom to choose to whom you wish to share your information, the freedom to move without being tracked, and the freedom from body searches and invasive probes is going away. When the basis for the western civilization is gone are we still the western civilization?

      [1] http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2009/oct/12/guardian-gagged-from-reporting-parliament
      [2] http://www.nrk.no/programmer/tv/brennpunkt/1.6819334 (Norwegian article with the Minton document)

      <>

      Main Stream Media no longer possess the necessary perseverance to do its job. MSM is immersed in shock and horror news. Most voters use MSM exclusively. It is still possible to prevent tacky surveillance from becoming the permanent future? For hundreds of years?

      <>

      Her crime were simply to exist. Not an act.
      Is she an immigrant? Is that a synonym for criminal?
      If she does not fit in the assumptions the system is based on, is she the problem?

      (
      To me this speaks of laws that use public resources to enforce digital restriction management, zones and market segmentation

      It speaks of “security” staff on airports, that in theory should increase the safety for passengers, that have provoked and hassled pilots to the extent that the pilots have deemed themselves unfit to fly until they have calmed down. That take the restrooms from pilots and crews at small airports. And does so with impunity, as “security is so important”

      … and so many other things in the real world. If the law/work is utterly disconnected from reality it is extra pigheadedly enforced it seams
      )

      As the time travelers comes from the future, their present themselves get hassled by the immigration (police). Is this hassling a wake-up call, to do something, instead of just being annoyed? If so, do they in part become a time traveler because they in the future were a time traveler?

      <>

      This jumps back to, what can we do, as in right now.
      How invasive would the surveillance be and who control the locks to your own house?
      With the exception of the existence of the time travel this might be the future.

      There is no reason to assume that time travel would be limitless should it exist. In addition the traveler would have to appear somewhere, which means a space known to be empty and without viewers.

      Will it be a time when it is to late to oppose massive surveillance?
      Probable.

      Would a “magic gadget” solve this problem?
      I don’t see how.

      Would people opposing surveillance, in a society with massive surveillance have access to such items;
      Unlikely

      Would dire consequences cause the politicians to reevaluate their positions?
      Unlikely, people defend their choices, not the least to themselves. And even more vigorously when tings go bad and the intention were deemed important.

      Is massive surveillance going to cause horrible unintended consequences?
      It always have. Always. So within the limits of induction; Yes

      This is the same in the real world, except no one is coming to save us.

    • 4.3
      Socrates

      *What can we do

      “And to the plot – please, really?? Time travel is possible, but they can’t send anyone to the point BEFORE they can be so easily captured and detained”

      And do what?
      As in what can you do now.

      “or at LEAST equip them with something useful?”

      Useful as in items you have access to now? If you use it before this surveillance happens, will it be prevented? How exactly? And that is not a rhetoric question.

      If you use it after the surveillance is in place, how can you prevent the predictable response that you in fact is the reason why it is necessary to go to such length with the surveillance. After all, you attack the system that is meant to keep the inhabitants safe.

      IMHO, most good science fiction foster thoughts about who we choose to be, and why we act a certain way; from a reference point that we might not have considered. It relates directly to that persons life. A “futuristic super gadget” would make the film less relevant. The film would cause fewer thoughts about what we can do. It would give a “solution” to the dilemma that does not exist in the real world.

      *Plausibility

      It is already happening.

      The Swedish FRA law, government employees that demand to snoop in travelers personal devices, Norwegian state broadcast journalists that notice that critical articles is inaccessible in USA, censorship of Gardian [1,2] in UK, TSA in USA establish checkpoints on interstate roads, …

      The freedom to choose to whom you wish to share your information, the freedom to move without being tracked, and the freedom from body searches and invasive probes is going away. When the basis for the western civilization is gone are we still the western civilization?

      [1] http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2009/oct/12/guardian-gagged-from-reporting-parliament
      [2] http://www.nrk.no/programmer/tv/brennpunkt/1.6819334 (Norwegian article with the Minton document)

      *Preventing the probable

      Main Stream Media no longer possess the necessary perseverance to do its job. MSM is immersed in shock and horror news. Most voters use MSM exclusively. It is still possible to prevent tacky surveillance from becoming the permanent future? For hundreds of years?

      *The crime

      Her crime were simply to exist. Not an act.
      Is she an immigrant? Is that a synonym for criminal?
      If she does not fit in the assumptions the system is based on, is she the problem?

      (
      To me this speaks of laws that use public resources to enforce digital restriction management, zones and market segmentation

      It speaks of “security” staff on airports, that in theory should increase the safety for passengers, that have provoked and hassled pilots to the extent that the pilots have deemed themselves unfit to fly until they have calmed down. That take the restrooms from pilots and crews at small airports. And does so with impunity, as “security is so important”

      … and so many other things in the real world. If the law/work is utterly disconnected from reality it is extra pigheadedly enforced it seams
      )

      As the time travelers comes from the future, their present themselves get hassled by the immigration (police). Is this hassling a wake-up call, to do something, instead of just being annoyed? If so, do they in part become a time traveler because they in the future were a time traveler?

      *Suspension of disbelief

      This jumps back to, what can we do, as in right now.
      How invasive would the surveillance be and who control the locks to your own house?
      With the exception of the existence of the time travel this might be the future.

      There is no reason to assume that time travel would be limitless should it exist. In addition the traveler would have to appear somewhere, which means a space known to be empty and without viewers.

      Will it be a time when it is to late to oppose massive surveillance?
      Probable.

      Would a “magic gadget” solve this problem?
      I don’t see how.

      Would people opposing surveillance, in a society with massive surveillance have access to such items;
      Unlikely

      Would dire consequences cause the politicians to reevaluate their positions?
      Unlikely, people defend their choices, not the least to themselves. And even more vigorously when tings go bad and the intention were deemed important.

      Is massive surveillance going to cause horrible unintended consequences?
      It always have. Always. So within the limits of induction; Yes

      This is the same in the real world, except no one is coming to save us.

  5. 6
    Mumfi.

    Error rate of 0,001? That would be at least millions of false positive per day. The authorities normal reaction to a duality would probably be more on the lines of “Can’t someone fix this shit!?”.

    • 6.1

      Yes, it would be a ridiculously high number, although it is obviously intended to sound well on the safe side. It’s kind of like in “Prometheus”, when Vickers obviously adlibs a comment about being “half a billion miles from Earth”, which is intended to sound ridiculously high but in reality is several order of magnitudes too low.

      To the movie’s defense, it’s also possible to interpret the .001 per cent error rate as being the probability of any collision within the data set over its lifetime (as they are describing the system), rather than the error rate on every individual reading. If so, it’s much more reasonable.

      • 6.1.1
        Mumfi.

        With 8 million inhabitants that still adds up to that it will happen to 8000 inhabitants during the course of their lives. That’s like 100 a year. One every third day. That’s a reasonable number for an organization to respond to actually. Still, as most positives will be false positives, and not all that uncommon, they are overreacting a bit.

        Error rates and big populations tend to surprise people.

        This is my mayor concern over DNA-registers. If authorities seek people out by register and then prosecute citing low error rates, it will lead to convictions. Problem is, in this case the probability of a mach is 100% and has nothing much to do with the person being guilty. Given a big population you will always get a couple of hundred matches. If not thousands. The probability of a match being guilty is one divided by the number of matches. Discounting errors in the data. Not a good way to convict citizens!

      • 6.1.2
        nyu

        If you only watched things like Prometheus I can understand why you don’t like video.

  6. 7

    That was amazing! I’ve also come to hate movies (though I still watch TV)….. just boring, boring, boring. And it takes a lot of talent to squeeze an entire story into just a few minutes – a lot more, I think, than dragging it out with tedious detail.

    I’m not as bothered, I think, with the technical bits (time travel issues, error rate.) I could see how that would bother a more detail-oriented or technical person. But I just like a good story – especially one with some heavy messages for the real world. And that’s something I RARELY see at the movies nowadays.

    Thanks for sharing this!

  7. 8
    jimbo

    conspiracy theorist? maybe i am. i dont know. but i’ll bet you a dime to a dollar that there is a 100x more chance of this for a future than one of freedom for all. to my mind, the biggest reason being that just about all governments are run by and full of people who are too damn old to accept, let alone be part of any sort of adaptive society. they are so entrenched in what happened when they were younger, with not wanting to change now, they forget that things are different and, with some foresight, could be even more different, more open and enjoyable. reducing crime is something that all except the criminals want but to forgo everything else to get it is not acceptable. pity we are part way there already and it is easier for those in charge, using military might when necessary, to convince themselves and us that moving this action forwards is better than stopping or retreating. we are gonna be so sorry, but power and money go together. try to remove one and the kickback from the other is huge!

  8. [...] Visto en Falkvinge. This entry was posted in Videos by txapulin. Bookmark the permalink. [...]

  9. 9
    steelneck

    Rick, this statement from you above is quite revealing:

    ” Not sure I can get rid of _every_ opportunity to track visitors”

    You even call it “opportunity”, i ought to be mad as hell, but this was just too much coming from you, i became sad. Godbye.

    • 9.1
      Scary Devil Monastery

      Honestly, Steelneck…cut the man some slack. Rick’s been putting his neck out there for quite some time. I very much doubt he either intends to peddle our private information to 3rd parties, or is interested in doing so.

      He’s also in the right of it. If I want to visit a blog dedicated to personal integrity I’m going to ask no further than that the owner of the blog spends a reasonable effort in not trying to allow third-party tracking. This I think is being done.

      The rest of it, really, is up to me. If I choose to visit a blog when I’m anxious not to let Google collate information about my visit, I utilize a VPN or Tor proxy.

      What is a truly interesting revelation here, for me, is the way it has become quite hard for anyone, even a skilled programmer, to set up a public forum without also inviting umpteen registration tools to monitor the proceedings.

      Take that anger and point it in the right direction, please.

      • 9.1.1
        Cron2

        I think the “Goodbye” of Steelneck means just that, so i answer instead.

        We can all see for a fact that he enable 3rd parties to track his visitors without their consent and his interest, among other things, is statistics or likes on Facebook. This is an active decision he has made. His code is there for anyone to see. When you visit this blog there are a number of scripts that is run on your computer gathering information about you that is sent to other domains than falkvinge.net, and objects that is served from other domains. It is Rick who has enabled this, he is responsible for his homepage, not someone else.

        For every object served from xyz, xyz will have your IP in their logs connecting you to Rick, and very important xyz have similar objects on most major sites, which means they do track your surfing habits very precise. They may even know more about you than you realize your self, and this information is for sale in one way or another, it is a part of their business model. I think governments in many cases are their biggest customers in secret. This is how it works to track people. All it takes to lure authors to engage in this scheme without force is to offer them some silly snippets of the gathered data regarding just their site, data that basically speaks to their vanity, and it works like a dream world wide.

        Is he in the right of it? Yes he is, just like anyone else who like to keep on to whatever double standard they carrying. It is really up to Rick. Has he spent a reasonable effort to disallow third-party tracking? No, on the contrary, to track is not the default. He has made an active decision to willingly put the code in place. At least up to this point. But as Steelneck points out, he still think of it as an “opportunity” to track his visitors, and still without their consent.

        You can protect your self and so can i, but on a blog dedicated to personal integrity? No, on this blog it is hypocrisy. I could at least understand it on some random blog about fashion or such, where the author simply do not know better, but not on any blog connected to the pirate party. Even the simple fact that they use Facebook actually say that they will break just about any principle they have in their pursuit of “likes”, this does not differ one bit from other politicians who say one thing and then do something completely different that better suits their own personal agenda.

        It is a double standard to actively enable the same tracking of people that he say he despise.

  10. 12

    Testing yet again. Keep ignoring.

  11. […] budget, men det är en annan fråga.) Filmen är dessutom konceptuellt intressant med en obehaglig känsla av hur det totala övervakningssamhället kan se […]

  12. 13

    Heya tɦis is kinda of off topіϲ but I was wondering if blogs use
    WYSIWYG editors օr іf you have to manuallу code with HTML.

    I’m starting a Ьlog ѕoon Ƅսt have no coding еxperience ѕo I ԝanted to get advice fro someone
    with experiencе. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

  13. 14

    Can I simply just say what a relief to discover a person that actually understands what they
    are talking about on the net. You certainly know how to bring an issue
    to light and make it important. More and more
    people ought to read this and understand this side of the story.
    I was surprised that you are not more popular given that you
    definitely have the gift.

Add a Comment

1 + = 9  

On Facebook

Popular Articles

PyramidCapital
24

Diversity – Zacqary Adam Xeper

Diversity – Zacqary Adam Xeper

Bitcoin concept
13

Cryptocurrency – Nozomi Hayase

Cryptocurrency – Nozomi Hayase

Other Recent Headlines

Screenshot from Librep-2014-08-10-take1.mp4
8

Civil Liberties

Civil Liberties

Librep July 12 frame
32

Civil Liberties

Civil Liberties

Money cut into pieces - Photo by Flickr user Tax Credits
78

Swarm Economy – Zacqary Adam Xeper

Swarm Economy – Zacqary Adam Xeper

colorblindflag
22

United States – Zacqary Adam Xeper

United States – Zacqary Adam Xeper

Adobe the leech - original photo by OakleyOriginals on Flickr
168

Swarm Economy – Zacqary Adam Xeper

Swarm Economy – Zacqary Adam Xeper

peter_sunde_0237
13

Swarm Economy – Lionel Dricot

Swarm Economy – Lionel Dricot

solarroad
16

Swarm Economy – Zacqary Adam Xeper

Swarm Economy – Zacqary Adam Xeper

European Parliament
70

Pirate Parties

Pirate Parties

Burned book
35

Civil Liberties – Henrik Alexandersson

Civil Liberties – Henrik Alexandersson

About The Author

Rick is the founder of the first Pirate Party and is a political evangelist, traveling around Europe and the world to talk and write about ideas of a sensible information policy. He has a tech entrepreneur background and loves whisky.

More On Infopolicy

NSA Seal Holding the Heartbleed Logo
40

Infrastructure – Zacqary Adam Xeper

Infrastructure – Zacqary Adam Xeper

Bitcoin concept by Antanacoins. CC-By-SA, Flickr.
42

Cryptocurrency – Charlie Shrem

Cryptocurrency – Charlie Shrem

Bottles of Snake Oil - Photo by Jagrap on Flickr
29

Copyright Monopoly – Zacqary Adam Xeper

Copyright Monopoly – Zacqary Adam Xeper

facebook
12

Swarm Economy – Zacqary Adam Xeper

Swarm Economy – Zacqary Adam Xeper

523377_63619557
4

Infopolicy – Henrik Brändén

Infopolicy – Henrik Brändén

photo_10071_20090418-646x363
71

Copyright Monopoly – David Collier-Brown

Copyright Monopoly – David Collier-Brown

National_Security_Agency_headquarters,_Fort_Meade,_Maryland_public_domain_image
154

Infopolicy – Christian Engström

Infopolicy – Christian Engström

"God Hates Signs" next to "God Hates Fags" protesters
8

Freedom of Speech – Zacqary Adam Xeper

Freedom of Speech – Zacqary Adam Xeper

Many different currencies - CC photo by epSos.de
45

Diversity – Zacqary Adam Xeper

Diversity – Zacqary Adam Xeper

le_tresor_rackham_le_rouge_1280x1024
11

Copyright Monopoly – Lionel Dricot

Copyright Monopoly – Lionel Dricot

Valve mechanism
95

Freedom of Speech

Freedom of Speech

Books before copyright
99

Copyright Monopoly – Johnny Olsson

Copyright Monopoly – Johnny Olsson

Collaborative whiteboard at OuiShare 2012, full of wonderful ideas for venture capitalists to ruin - photo by Natalie Ortiz
15

Swarm Economy – Zacqary Adam Xeper

Swarm Economy – Zacqary Adam Xeper

Spices - Marrakech 09 Souks
58

Swarm Economy

Swarm Economy

Screen Shot 2013-06-27 at 7.23.12 PM
33

Copyright Monopoly – Travis McCrea

Copyright Monopoly – Travis McCrea

An Ouya console and controller
15

Infopolicy – Zacqary Adam Xeper

Infopolicy – Zacqary Adam Xeper

Smári McCarthy
36

Privacy – Christian Engström

Privacy – Christian Engström

1984-ish poster from London's Public Transport
8

Privacy – Loz Kaye

Privacy – Loz Kaye

Man slamming his head on a desk in frustration - CC photo by Flickr user mbshane
36

Privacy – Zacqary Adam Xeper

Privacy – Zacqary Adam Xeper

This publication is protected under the Constitution of the Kingdom of Sweden. Any problem you have with this publication remains exclusively yours. Accountable publisher: Rick Falkvinge.
All text on this site is Public Domain / CC0 unless specifically noted and credited otherwise. Copy, remix, and inspire. (Troll policy.)
Log in | Original theme design by Gabfire themes (heavily modified)